Scrivener for Thesis Writing: Bibliographic Software [Endnote]

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

It is possible to use Scrivener and bibliographic software. I’m most familiar with Endnote, so this tutorial will focus on Endnote, though I’m sure that you could adapt it to other software.
Note: Scrivener does not do CWYW – it won’t compile a nice Bibliography at the end for you, but I’m assuming that most thesis writers are going to have to take their thesis into Microsoft Word at some stage, so I don’t see this as huge issue.
  1.  Nominate your Bibliographic Software in Preferences
Scrivener Preferences Bibliography Manager

Scrivener / Preferences / Bibliography Manager

2. Familiarise yourself with Shortcut keys.  It makes including references so much easier. Here are the basics that you should know [mac]

cmd-c for copy

cmd-v for paste

cmd-h for hide

cmd-tab for switching between different open programs.

cmd-z for undo

I also like cmd-shft-v for paste and match style otherwise I find my text ending up all messy.

3. Open up your Endnote Library.

4.  Select the citation that you want to insert.

5. cmd-c for copy

6. Don’t close or minimise Endnote. Instead just cmd-tab for switching between different open programs (Note: if you’ve got too many programs open then this doesn’t work nicely. Try to just have Scrivener and Endnote open and up on the screen. Other programs should be minimised).

7. In Scrivener, just cmd-shft-v for paste. You can also cmd-v but this will then switch to your Endnote font.

8. Your citation will look something like

{Burton, 2006 #1672}

Scrivener Bibliography Insert Reference

Scrivener Bibliography Insert Reference

9. You can easily adjust this. Lets say you want to add page numbers. Just type directly into the citation

{Burton, 2006 #1672, pp.3-16}

You can see I’ve added a comma and then the pages. Endnote can ‘read’ this information later when you compile a Bibliography in Word.

If you want to omit the author

{, 2006 #1672}

You can do this because Endnote is searching for the reference number (in this case #1672).

10. You don’t need to necessarily keep flipping back to Endnote. I do this mostly cause it is good practice but you can just type in directly. Endnote will then help you sort out the references later. For instance, if I was working on my thesis somewhere without my Endnote library I could just type directly in

{Burton, 2006, pp.3-16}

I wouldn’t remember the reference number but Endnote should help me search based on the author surname and year.

Done! I hope you found this helpful. Any questions ask me in the comments.

Remember if you know a PhD student writing their thesis and they don’t yet know about Scrivener- please introduce them to this blog!

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Working with a two-track mind

Music can a great mood lifter, ease anxiety and make you feel motivated

Music can a great mood lifter, ease anxiety and make you feel motivated

This might seem counter-intuitive but to focus I seem to need to be super-distracted. My best work is often done with earplugs in busy, noisy cafes.
The quiet space of a computer in a non-disruptions room finds me reading the news, looking at blogs, checking my email, checking my emails, checking twitter, checking my emails…you get the picture.
So it seems like my mind needs to be two-track. My latest strategy for dealing with this is have Spotify playing loudly in my office (some Leonard Cohen anyone?) and then put in my earphones and type type type. Weird but its works.
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Scrap Booking Your Thesis Thoughts

qualitative research

Buy a cheap $3 kids scrapbook. Forget the moleskin.

Much of the advice about doing a PhD and in particular the ‘writing the thesis’ part involves doing mindmaps, network diagrams, scribbles, drawings – any type of visualisation technique that will allow you to break from the 2 dimensional linear-word-on-page and get out that 3 dimensional understanding that you have of your research.

However, where should you keep all this?
I’ve found having a cheap $3 kids scrapbook has been one of my most useful ‘thought collection’ repositories. Forget Moleskin diaries (you are a PhD student right? Who has $25 to spend on a blank book?) or anything fancy – here are your list of essential tools for Thesis Scrapbooking
  • 1 x Scrapbook. A big one. It should not fit into your handbag/manbag.  But then again, you are not an undergrad visual arts student – you don’t need it to be knee-high. Check out the kids section in your local supermarket. Mine is 64 pages.
  • Post-it notes: all sizes (raid your Faculty stationary for these as they can be expensive).
  • a nice texta: black (also known as Sharpies)
  • a glue stick
Optional:
  • coloured textas or pencils
  • access to a printer and/or photocopier.
I’ve used mine in a variety of ways, here are some examples with snapshots
……….
Example 1:  A Table that I started in the Scrap book but then took into digital version. The whole idea is to get your ideas started and following. I’ve started many diagrams and tables that didn’t end up being used. That is ok. It is better to have a variety to choose from rather than none at all.
Example of a Table that I didn't complete in the scrapbook but then worked on a digital file

Example of a Table that I didn’t complete in the scrapbook but then worked on a digital file

Example 2 and 3: Here is a question my Supervisor posed to me. I felt like I kind-of knew the answer but really struggled to articulate it . I started working on it in my scrapbook and eventually took it into my thesis. I don’t have this diagram in my thesis, but it allowed me to conceptually make links between items in a way that made sense to me. I don’t think I could have done this by writing the linear-word-on-the-page

The original question posed by my Supervisors

The original question posed by my Supervisors

Example of building on a central concept or questions in your qualitative research

Example of building on a central concept or questions in your qualitative research

Example 4:  This is a framework that I was trying to develop to see how different concepts might fit together. I worked on the diagram in Google Drawings (online via Google Drive) and then printed it out and glued into my scrapbook. I knew the Framework wasn’t quite right. Having it there next to my computer meant I could add and write and draw & then edit the online version later.

The draft Framework, printed and built upon

The draft Framework, printed and built upon

Example 5:  I was not feeling the above Framework, so I started to sketch some other ways that I could present the linkages between the concepts. This was inspired by an image that I found online ( I have a folder that titled “Visual Inspirations”) and I was playing around seeing if the format would suit me.

First sketches of how to link different concepts

First sketches of how to link different concepts

I hope that these real examples from my thesis scrapbook have inspired you to do the same. I know it can be hard to understand what exactly people mean when they say “you should mind-map”.

If you have some of your own sketches or scrapbook-your-thesis ideas, please share in the comments so that other people can see them and be inspired.

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Coding through your embarrassment

Coding and reading transcripts can be a cringe worthy experience

Coding and reading transcripts can be a cringe worthy experience

Anyone who has had to listen their own recorded voice will relate to this. It’s the cringe factor and embarrassment of hearing your own voice, mannerisms and ‘research-self’ in your research recordings. I’ve never heard anyone say oh, but I sound wonderful when I listen back to myself in an interivew.

Listening to your voice and ‘verbal habits’ [in my case my constant interruptions of a co-researcher] forever recorded, engraved and soon to be public when I put my interview recordings on a public database is sometimes a gut-wrenching experience. I have literally blushed at my desk whilst re-listening to interview recordings. Even though I changed this behaviour of interrupting my co-researcher during my ‘field research’- when I go back to listen to these interviews – *cringe* – there I am again interrupting.

Possibly worse is when you realise your previous-researcher-interviewer-self who thought that they knew what they doing (e.g. lets lead the topic of conversation away from this interesting but really irrelevant piece of information back the things that I think are important) clashes with your current-researcher-analysis-self !

damn! Why did I interrupt? That story is now highly relevant and I didn’t let the participant flesh out more details for me!

I think this is a factor of audio recording that we all just have to suck up. Unless you have access to funds to go and do a radio presenter course or seriously hone your interview style.

But part of the research process is being the ‘authentic-researcher-you’. You’ve got to make a connection, build trust, feel human to your research participants. This means lots of umms, arhs, and accepting you’ll cringe later. And perhaps consider cutting other researchers a break if you are listening to their recordings.

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Scrivener for Thesis Writing: Backing Up, Snapshots & Compiling

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

You’ve probably heard it a million times, but you need backups. There is nothing more tragic than a lost thesis due to software failure /hardware failure/loss/theft (ok, there are more tragic things and Australia’s treatment of asylum seekers is one of them, but within the thesis-writing-world I’m referring to)
So here is quick guide to providing lots of copies of your thesis. Some of these can be automated and some you should just do on a regular basis (like the moment you’ve had a super productive writing day).  I strongly recommend that you do all three methods
Method 1: Automatic Back-Ups to Dropbox or External Hard Drive
I work directly from my hard drive but back up to Dropbox. There are many reasons for this but mostly it is to protect my main document from being inadvertently corrupted.
To back up to Dropbox you need to:
  1. Ensure that Dropbox is installed on your computer/laptop and you know where the Dropbox folder is
  2. Go to the Scrivener->Preferences->Back-Up Menu option
  3. Choose your options. For instance, I back up every time on project close. This ensure I have a copy elsewhere of my project from everyday.
  4. Finished!
Automatic Backup Button

Automatic Backup Button

If you prefer to use an external hard-drive, follow the same steps but nominate the hard-drive as your back-up location.
Method 2: Automatic Snapshots
This step assumes that you are in the good habit of regularly hitting cmd-s (save) whilst you are working.  Once you set it up, Scrivener will take a ‘snapshot’ (version record) of each section that you change in a day.
  1. Go to the Scrivener->Preferences->General Option
  2. Tick “Take Snapshots of changed text documents on manual save”
  3. Finished!
Snapshots is essentially version control

Snapshots is essentially version control

Method 3: Compile a word copy
This is manual method to save your work. Compiling into another format is good habit- I don’t worry too much about changing the compile presets- I just choose “Non-Fiction with Subheads (hierarchical)” and ensure that I have Microsoft word selected as the format type. This means if something terrible ever happens to my Scrivener project, at least I’ll have a word version.
To save your copy some-where else (e.g. not the computer you are working on), you could
  • email it yourself
  • upload it to Google Docs
  • save it to Dropbox
  • save it to a USB stick
  • add it to your uni server
Just remember to be consistent so that in the event of a thesis disaster you know where the most-to-date version is.
 
NB: There are some security issues with using Dropbox and Google Docs for your intellectual property. Just google cloud services and intellectual property for making a more informed choice or follow your universities guidelines.
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Scrivener for Thesis Writing: Setting Up a Thesis Structure importing from Word

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

This post will cover importing and working from a Microsoft Word document that you’ve already started.
Before proceeding I highly recommend that you’ve downloaded Scrivener and spent a few hours undertaking the Interactive Tutorial and/or watched some Literature and Latte YouTubes (at least watch the Introduction one). This will give a good idea of what Scrivener is capable of.
Remember, these documents will most likely change. Your thesis will evolve, some bits will be scrapped, some chapters will become so big and unwieldy that you’ll divide them up – this is ok.
Firstly, you’ll need to set up a document in Scrivener into which you’ll import your word document.  You’ll also have to make some adjustments to your word document to make it play nicely with Scrivener.
NB: If your document is less than 10 pages long- you could do a straight copy/paste into Scrivener.  This tutorial is aimed at those with >10 pages in Microsoft Word.
Step 1: Set Up your empty (ready and waiting) thesis document in Scrivener
 
Scrivener comes with inbuilt templates.  We are going to use the template Non-Fiction -> Non-Fiction with Sub-Heads.
I recommend namely this project
Draft_Thesis_daymonthyear.scriv
Alternatively, if you are using a shared computer include your name
Name_draft_thesis_daymonthyear.scriv
This is what it will look like:
Scrivener for thesis writing using academic template

Standard Scrivener Template Introduction page

Step 2: Open your Microsoft word document:
Tip:  The beauty of Scrivener is that it allows you to easily move between working on individual sections to working on your whole thesis. You need to do this step so that your ‘sections’ in Microsoft Word are recognised by Scrivener.
 I’m assuming here that you have used ‘styles’ in your Microsoft word document and that it is divided into sections via “Heading 1” or “Heading 2” etc.
Unfortunately, this isn’t going to help you much in Scrivener.
You are going to have to add a # to each of your sections so that Scrivener will import correctly and divide up your Chapters.
Tip: You can skip this step and import the whole document into Scrivener without Chapter divisions. Your headings will still be there but you won’t be “Scrivener ready” . Skip to Step 3 if you prefer to divide up your document later (manually).
Using the ‘Find’ Function- finding all instances of a certain heading and ADD a # at the beginning of the Section title
Save and close your document once you’ve add a # to each of the sections.
Using the Find-Format function

Using the Find-Format function

Step 3: Import the document into Scrivener
File -> Import- > Import and Split (check that the “Sections are separated by” box contains a hashtag
Access via the File Menu

Access via the File Menu

Scrivener will probably place your imported Thesis under Endnotes. Just leave it there for the moment.
Step 4: Creating Folders based on your Thesis Structure
 
As you’ve already got a thesis-I’m assuming this means that you have a structure and have thought through this previously. If not- or if you don’t like the current structure of your thesis- take some time now to re-think how you would like to organise it.
Some universities/disciplines are very prescriptive and have a structure that you must follow. Others will have more flexibility.  Regardless of whether you are following a predetermined structure or figuring it out as you go along, there are some essentials as to what the thesis structure should look like / do.
I suggest that you read these posts
I recommend using a single folder to contain a Thesis Chapter.  To create a Folder- you can either (a) Duplicate an existing folder or (b) create a folder from scratch
(a) Duplicate an existing Folder by selecting the folder, right click and choosing ‘duplicate’
How to create duplicate folders for your thesis

Right-Click to access Duplicate Folder

(b) To create a folder from Scratch – you just click the ‘Add Folder’ icon on the bottom left of the Binder
Folder Creation in Scrivener

Create a folder using the +Folder button

Step 5: Adding your files into your Folders
 
As you’ve now created your Chapters [Folders]- you can now add the files you imported into each Chapter. You can choose multiple files by holding down the shift-key- you should then be able to move them as a batch via drag and drop. You can also do it via the right-click menu
Moving your word files into your new created Scrivener Folders

Moving your word files into your new created Scrivener Folders

Step 6: Some final housekeeping
Organising the Front Matter.
‘Front Matter’ is the standard first page that will accompany your draft thesis (kind of like a cover page). This template has a page called ‘Title Page’. This title page uses placeholders that will automatically generate text when you compile (that is, export or print) your work.  We are going to turn the ‘Title Page’ into  a ‘Front Matter’ page- essentially because it should be out of the way for thesis writing (rather than sitting up the top next to ‘Manuscript’)
  1. Go to Project -> Meta Data Settings and insert your thesis title and your name. Write down a real name for your thesis (not “draft thesis” but “An examination of X issue using whatever theory” type title)
  2. Rename the ‘Title Page’ document ‘Front Matter’ (either double-click or right-click rename)
  3. Tweak the text on the Front Matter Page. You could add more Placeholder Tags (for instance, to automatically generate the current date with <$Modifieddate>), delete ‘agents name’ and replace with your Supervisor’s Name.  Tip: You can find all the Placeholder Tags in Scrivener by going to Help – > Placeholder Tags
  4. Delete the documents titled ‘Contents’ and ‘Foreword’
  5. Move the ‘Front Matter’ document down to just above the Trash. You can do this by drag and drop.
Move the front matter folder to the bottom

Move the front matter folder to the bottom

Popping all this information onto a ‘Front Matter’ page matters because when you are taking your work out of Scrivener, you can use to include it or leave it via a simple button. I’ll cover this in another post but for now, just know that it is there and will be useful.
Done!
Any questions, please use the comments box to ask. If you have a friend or family writing their thesis or dissertation and not using Scrivener, please share this post with them!
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Scrivener for Thesis Writing: Setting Up a Thesis Structure using Scrivener Template

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

Here we are at the beginning. Before proceeding I highly recommend that you’ve downloaded Scrivener and spent a few hours undertaking the Interactive Tutorial and/or watched some Literature and Latte YouTubes (at least watch the Introduction one). This will give a good idea of what Scrivener is capable of.
I’m going to cover two ways to start writing a Thesis Structure in Scrivener. The first method will be starting a brand new document in Scrivener. This post is focused on using Scrivener’s standard template.
The second method will be importing and working from a Microsoft Word document that you’ve already started.  This method is covered in this blog post.
Remember, these documents will most likely change. Your thesis will evolve, some bits will be scrapped, some chapters will become so big and unwieldy that you’ll divide them up – this is ok.
Method 1: Setting Up Your Thesis Structure directly in Scrivener. 
Step 1:
Scrivener comes with inbuilt templates.  We are going to use the template Non-Fiction -> Non-Fiction with Sub-Heads.
I recommend namely this project
Draft_Thesis_daymonthyear.scriv
Alternatively, if you are using a shared computer include your name
Name_draft_thesis_daymonthyear.scriv
This is what it will look like:
Scrivener for thesis writing using academic template

Standard Scrivener Template Introduction page

Now the this website (http://u.osu.edu/hackingthethesis/managing-writing/scrivener/) recommends populating more chapters with generic text such the Chapter Introduction and Conclusion.  You can do this but I don’t yet recommend it.
Step 2: Organising the Front Matter.
‘Front Matter’ is the standard first page that will accompany your draft thesis (kind of like a cover page). This template has a page called ‘Title Page’. This title page uses placeholders that will automatically generate text when you compile (that is, export or print) your work.  We are going to turn the ‘Title Page’ into  a ‘Front Matter’ page- essentially because it should be out of the way for thesis writing (rather than sitting up the top next to ‘Manuscript’)
  1. Go to Project -> Meta Data Settings and insert your thesis title and your name. Write down a real name for your thesis (not “draft thesis” but “An examination of X issue using whatever theory” type title)
  2. Rename the ‘Title Page’ document ‘Front Matter’ (either double-click or right-click rename)
  3. Tweak the text on the Front Matter Page. You could add more Placeholder Tags (for instance, to automatically generate the current date with <$Modifieddate>), delete ‘agents name’ and replace with your Supervisor’s Name.  Tip: You can find all the Placeholder Tags in Scrivener by going to Help – > Placeholder Tags
  4. Delete the documents titled ‘Contents’ and ‘Foreword’
  5. Move the ‘Front Matter’ document down to just above the Trash. You can do this by drag and drop.
Popping all this information onto a ‘Front Matter’ page matters because when you are taking your work out of Scrivener, you can use to include it or leave it via a simple button. I’ll cover this in another post but for now, just know that it is there and will be useful.
Step 3: Creating Folders based on your Thesis Structure
 
This step will depend if you have a good idea what your thesis will look like.  Some universities/disciplines are very prescriptive and you may well already a set structure that you must follow. Others will have more flexibility for the thesis structure.  Regardless of whether you are following a predetermined structure or figuring it out as you go along, there are some essentials as to what the thesis structure should look like / do.
I suggest that you read these posts
I recommend using a single folder to contain a Thesis Chapter.  To create a Folder- you can either (a) Duplicate an existing folder or (b) create a folder from scratch
(a) Duplicate an existing Folder by selecting the folder, right click and choosing ‘duplicate’
How to create duplicate folders for your thesis

Right-Click to access Duplicate Folder

(b) To create a folder from Scratch – you just click the ‘Add Folder’ icon on the bottom left of the Binder
Folder Creation in Scrivener

Create a folder using the +Folder button

Step 4: Add Sections to your Chapters[Folders]
Each Folder should essentially contain a Chapter of your Thesis. Now you might be ready to add sections. At the first draft stage, these can contain as many sections as you want. You have a couple of choices at this stage
  • Leave the folders empty:  to be filled as you are ready to write the sections
  • Create the Sections now:  based on a rough idea of what you want to write in each Section
  • Import some material from elsewhere: For example, an Nvivo report, a Literature Review you’ve already written.
I’m going to leave this up to you.
Step 5: Structure is done!
Any questions please ask in the comments section.
If you know someone trying to write their thesis or dissertation and they are not using Scrivener, please share this post with them.
Next I suggest
  • Setting Your Thesis Writing Targets
  • Setting up the backup options
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Scrivener for Thesis Writing: Post 1 Intentions and Topics

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

Scrivener for Thesis Writing

Welcome to the first of a series about using Scrivener for writing your Thesis or Dissertation.

This is primarily aimed at Higher Degree Research students who are required to write a long thesis or dissertation.  I’m hoping that this series of blog posts will assist you maximise Scrivener’s functionality for your thesis writing.

Of course, there are many ways to use Scrivener and I highly recommend undertaking the Interactive Tutorial and watching the Literature Latte YouTube channel.

However, it can be tricky to understand just how perfect Scrivener is going to be for writing your thesis whilst you are trying to learn to use a new piece of software. These posts will be focused on sharing tips and tricks that I’ve learnt whilst using Scrivener for Thesis Writing and hopefully maximise your writing time.

Disclaimer:

Literature and Latte and Scrivener don’t have anything to do with this blog or series on Scrivener for Thesis Writing. I’m sharing this because I think Scrivener is pretty awesome and writing the blog has helped me on my own writing journey.

I don’t know everything about Scrivener and there are many different workflows for different writers. This is my way –  if you’ve got other experiences or options you’d like share- please feel free to add in the comments.

If you feel like purchasing Scrivener- please do so via the link on this website (pending). This means I get a small commission. I’m a PhD student (still) and this commission may fund a lovely cappuccino for me.

I’m sorting out the order of the posts at the moment. All these will focused on academic writing, specifically Thesis and Dissertation writing. Here’s an overview of what I hope to cover:

  • Setting Up aThesis Structure
  • Backing Up, Snapshots and Compiling
  • Thesis Completion Plan
  • Bibliographic Software
  • Project Targets
  • Storyboarding
  • Snapshots and Version Control
  • Fullscreen Mode
  • Inspector: Document Notes
  • Inspector: Project Notes
  • Inspector: Synopsis
  • Append Selection to Document
  • Inspector: Comments
  • Using Icons to help orient your Thoughts
  • Using comments to manage your Participants Quotes (Bi-Lingual)
  • Split Screen / Pane
  • Advanced Split Screen / Pane
  • Writing in Circles
  • Going back and forth with Microsoft Word
  • Presets

Give me a shout out if there is something you’d like me to cover sooner rather than later.

Yes, I’m still writing my Thesis – its a qualitative piece of research- so these posts reflect this. The screen shots are from my actual thesis –  please respect this and accept the messiness of  a work in progress.

I try and blog about non-Scrivener qualitative research and PhD related stuff. I’m on Twitter.

Please don’t copy and paste these posts into your blog or other format – happy for you to share the link if you think they are useful!

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Micro-aggression in academia (& especially in your PhD)

Aggressive Lego Man

Microaggression  – if you haven’t heard this term before have a quick look at Wikipedia  – it is basically the small, inane comments that people make that are actually insulting, degrading or aggressive – but said in such a way that if you react – you look like the super-sensitive over-reactor!

“brief, everyday exchanges that send denigrating messages to certain individuals because of their group membership.” Prof. Derald Wing Sue

From a quick google search, it appears that most micro-aggression theory is related to race and gender. I think that micro- aggression is also well and alive in academia, and the idea of micro-aggression can be applied toward  the experiences of many doctoral researchers or early career researchers as they start out in academia.

(microaggressors)…minimise the existence of discrimination against the minority group [and] seek to deny the perpetrator’s own bias (quote from Wikipedia)

The trouble with micro-aggression in academia – is that some of it might be based on potential truths and/or insecurities that doctoral researchers have internalised- (hello impostors syndrome).

And the trouble is – how to call it out? How to say ‘that’s super inappropriate’ – especially when this is the Faculty or group of colleagues that you have to keep on side!

Here are some examples from a great website about micro-aggressions that encourage people to share their own experiences

————————–

Stranger:What do you do?
Me:I’m a professor.
Stranger:You’re way too young to be a professor. You look like a student.
I’m in my 30s and I dress more professionally than my colleagues. But I’m also petite and female. My male partner, who has the same age and occupation, is never told that he doesn’t look like a professor. It sends me the message that I’m an imposter, merely play-acting at being a serious scholar or authority figure. Made me feel like no one will take me seriously despite my accomplishments.

—————————————

“Are you sure you have the right room number? This is the *honors* section.”

———————————-

Wow, you’re really good at this!

Male co-worker, in a tone of great surprise, at seeing me use a screwdriver to open my PC because the hard drive had failed. I’m female, 24, and I have a master’s in computer science. Made me feel undervalued, like he’s expecting less of me because of my gender.

………………………………………………

The term “microaggression” is somewhat misleading when looked at from the  victim’s perspective. A microaggressions is only “micro” when it is compared to acts of outright sexism or racism. If someone calls me a c*nt or calls my black friend a n*gg*r, that is hate speech and everyone will recognize it as such and agree that it is unacceptable in civil society. A microaggression is not “micro” in the sense that it is less disturbing  and less hurtful than this kind of hate speech. It is only “micro” in the sense that  privileged members of the community will regard it as trivial, if they notice it at all. Catherine Wells. (p.9)

So here comes the the bit- should you call people out?

I’ve recently been listening to one of my favourite podcasts by RadioLab and they have this episode called “Whats Left when You’re Right“- and there is this story about two friends and their different personalities.  One who tends to call people out on their ‘micro-aggressions’ and the other who doesn’t.

For me personally – standing up for myself often feels like I am becoming the aggressor. I struggle with saying and expressing how I really feel – perhaps because I’ve been brought up to be the ‘good girl’ – accommodating, complacent, accepting.  When I step outside these internal boundaries- I feel like I’m being antagonistic and aggressive somehow. And yet – like Lou in the podcast- I strongly admire when people do call the shots on bull-shit. When they just say – no way, that is crap. And often I see that the outcomes are not so terrible and like in Lou’s story- the outcomes are actually better for everyone involved.

Have you experienced micro-aggression in university? Either the traditional kind based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation or the academic kind? Would love to hear how you’ve dealt with it.

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Scrivener: Compile vs Export

Scrivener has several options for getting your work out of Scrivener and into other formats.  However- there are key differences between compile and export.

Compile:  does what it’s name suggests – it takes all the little pieces that you’ve written and complies them into the one document. You can tweak what’s included and insert Chapter breaks, section breaks, choose to have notes and comments or no notes and comments – but basically it is creating one big long document.

Export:  Whilst Scrivener has a seamless interface and it looks like all your work is linked whilst you are working on it – actually each section is saved as separate file in the background. When you export – Scrivener is saving each individual file for you.

Here is the difference between Compile and Export on a short piece from my thesis:

Compile:

You select from within the compile option which sections to include (in this case I’ve chose ‘orienting concepts’ and unticked the other options).

Compile

Compile

All the smaller sub-sections are essentially ‘merged’ and compiled as one document. This is the preview once I’ve compiled it

all the sub-sections are merged

all the sub-sections are merged

Export: Export maintains the individuality of your files. You also need to select the files you want to export BEFORE going into the export option. The export option primarily is asking you where you want to save the files.

Chose your export files first as you can't select them once 'export' is open

Chose your export files first as you can’t select them once ‘export’ is open

This is what the exported ‘Orienting Concepts’ looks like:

Note the folder structure- each section is maintained individually

Note the folder structure- each section is maintained individually

I think it is good practice to regularly take your thesis or any other work out of Scrivener and save elsewhere – cloud storage or usb stick or external hard-drive and do so in a more commonly accessible format. Whether you compile or export depends on how you might work on your document if you couldn’t access Scrivener for a while.

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